Categorized | Latest news

US EMBASSY: TERROR ALERT IN MOMBASA

Bomb experts from the Kenya Police off-load a box containing explosive material found at the Mombasa Golf Club June 21, 2012. The United States ordered its government officials to leave Mombasa over an "imminent threat of a terrorist attack" June 23, 2012

The United States embassy in Nairobi issued a terror alert for Mombasa this morning, requested US citizens to leave the city and suspended all US government travel to that area of the coast until July 1.

“IMMINENT THREAT” OF TERRORIST ATTACK ON MOMBASA

US Embassy statement reads:

“This is to alert all US citizens in Kenya, or planning to travel to Kenya in the near future, that the US Embassy in Nairobi has received information of an imminent threat of a terrorist attack in Mombasa, Kenya.

“All US government travel to Mombasa is suspended until July 1, 2012.  All US government personnel are required to leave Mombasa”.

More later…

Today the UK Government have increased their travel status warnings to tourists visiting Kenya:

“Avoid all but essential travel to part(s) of country”

Kenya

Still current at: 23 June 2012
Updated: 23 June 2012
No restrictions in this travel advice Avoid all but essential travel to part(s) of country Avoid all but essential travel to whole country Avoid all travel to part(s) of country Avoid all travel to whole country

This advice has been reviewed and reissued with amendments to the Travel Summary (US warning of possible imminent terrorist attacks in Mombasa). The overall level of the advice has not changed. We advise against all but essential travel to within 60km of the Somali border (including Kiwayu and coastal areas north of Pate Island), to Garissa district and to low income areas of Nairobi, including all township or slum areas.

To see an enlarged version of this map, click here (368).

Travel advice for this country

  • The US Embassy in Nairobi has issued an emergency message to its citizens warning of the possibility of an imminent terrorist attack in Mombasa. Such attacks could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. Places where local and foreign nationals congregate, such as bars and shopping centres, could be particular targets. We advise British nationals to exercise extra caution and vigilance when considering visiting such places.
  • On 28 May 2012, an Improvised Explosive Device exploded in the Central Business District of Nairobi near Mount Kenya University killing one person and injuring at least 27 people. Police suspect this to be terrorist related although no-one has yet claimed responsibility.
  • There was a reported grenade attack on a church near Nairobi city centre on 29 April, with one reported death and a number of injuries. There was another reported grenade attack on a club in Mombasa on the evening of 15 May, where a number of people were injured.
  • There were a series of explosive devices detonated in the evening of 31 March: one in Mtwapa, a town 15km north of Mombasa, and others in a bar near Mombasa stadium. A number of people have been injured.
  • There was a series of suspected grenade explosions at Country Bus Station in Nairobi’s Central Business District during the evening of 10 March. At least six people were reported killed and over 60 injured.
  • We advise against all but essential travel within 60km of the Kenya-Somalia border (including Kiwayu and coastal areas north of Pate Island) and to Garissa District due to the threat of kidnap and continuing instability in these areas.
  • There is a high threat from terrorism in Kenya. Attacks may target Kenyan government and other public institutions, but could be indiscriminate including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers, such as hotels, bars, shopping centres and beaches. On 23 April the US Embassy in Nairobi issued awarning that it had received credible information regarding a possible attack on Nairobi hotels and prominent Kenyan government buildings. The timing of the attack is not known, however, the US Embassy has reason to believe that the potential attack is in the last stages of planning. On 5 January 2012, the Kenyan authorities alerted the public to a heightened threat from terrorist attacks in Nairobi. We advise British nationals to exercise extra vigilance and caution in public places and at public events.
  • There is a high threat of kidnapping in the areas within 60km of the Somali border and in Garissa District. Westerners have previously been the target of kidnaps and further attacks in these areas are likely.
  • Piracy is a significant threat in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean, especially for shipping which does not take appropriate precautions or follow agreed shipping industry best practice guidelines. On 23 October 2009, two British nationals were taken hostage while sailing in the Indian Ocean. They were approximately 60 nautical miles from the Seychelles’ main island of Mahé. Since this incident occurred, other nationals have been taken from yachts.
  • We advise against all but essential travel to low income areas of Nairobi, including all township or slum areas, which experience high crime levels.  Our advice against all but essential travel to low income areas of Nairobi does not include or affect transit through Nairobi airport.  See Safety and Security – Crime.
  • Large public gatherings and demonstrations occur from time to time in Kenya and these should be avoided.  Any rally, even if advertised as peaceful, could potentially turn violent. You should check local media reports for information about any planned demonstrations.
  • 174,051 British nationals visited Kenya in 2010 (Source: Kenya Tourist Board). Most visits are trouble-free.  81 British nationals required consular assistance in Kenya in the period 01 April 2010 – 31 March 2011.
  • You should take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.

Safety and Security – Terrorism

There is a high threat from terrorism in Kenya. Attacks are highly likely and could affect British travellers. Attacks may target Kenyan government and other public institutions, but could be indiscriminate including in places frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers, such as hotels, bars, shopping centres and beaches. On 23 April the US Embassy in Nairobi issued awarning that it had received credible information regarding a possible attack on Nairobi hotels and prominent Kenyan government buildings. The timing of the attack is not known, however, the US Embassy has reason to believe that the potential attack is in the last stages of planning. On 5 January, the Kenyan authorities alerted the public to a heightened threat from terrorist attacks in Nairobi. We advise British nationals to exercise extra vigilance and caution in public places and at public events.

The Kenyan authorities have increased security to counter potential reprisal attacks following Kenyan military intervention in Somalia.

There is a high threat of kidnapping in the areas within 60km of the Kenya-Somalia border and in Garissa District. Westerners have previously been the target of kidnaps and further attacks in these areas are likely.

There were two attacks by armed gangs in small boats against beach resorts on 11 September (Kiwayu) and 1 October 2011 (Manda Island, Lamu). Both attacks were on beach-front properties, with two Westerners kidnapped and one murdered. Security in these areas has been tightened. However, beach-front accommodation and boats off the coast in areas close to the Somali border remain vulnerable.

You should be aware that the long-standing policy of the British Government is not to make substantive concessions to hostage takers. The British Government considers that paying ransoms and releasing prisoners increases the risk of further hostage taking.

British aid workers and others working at or visiting Dadaab refugee camp should satisfy themselves that their employer, or those arranging their visit to the camp, has sufficient security arrangements in place during their stay.

Recent attacks in Kenya include:

  • There was a reported grenade attack on a club in Mombasa on the evening of 15 May, where a number of people were injured.
  • There was a reported grenade attack on a church near Nairobi city centre on 29 April, with one reported death and a number of injuries.
  • There were a series of explosive devices detonated in the evening of 31 March: one in Mtwapa, a town 15km north of Mombasa, and others in a bar near Mombasa stadium. A number of people have been injured.
  • On 12 January 2012, terrorists attacked a police camp near Wajir using explosives and gunfire. At least five people were killed.
  • On 31 December 2011, a hand grenade attack on a club in Garissa town killed five people.
  • On 24 December 2011, a hand grenade at a bar in Wajir wounded at least six people.
  • On the weekend of 5-6 November 2011, an unexploded Improvised Explosive Device (IED) was found near Hagadera, (a sub-camp of Dadaab refugee camp).
  • On the weekend of 5-6 November 2011, there was a grenade attack on a church in Garissa Town that killed 2 people.
  • On 28 October 2011, a police vehicle was hit by an IED in Garissa Town.
  • On 27 October 2011 there was an attack on a vehicle in Mandera. Several people were killed.
  • On 24 October 2011, there was a grenade attack at a bar near the business district in Nairobi. Several people were injured. An explosive device was also thrown at a bus stop in central Nairobi. One person was killed and several injured.
  • On 13 October 2011, two aid workers were kidnapped from Dadaab refugee camp.
  • On 1 October 2011, A French national was kidnapped at a beach resort close to Lamu, 150km from the Kenya-Somalia border.
  • On 11 September 2011, Two British nationals were attacked at a beach resort north of Lamu, near the Kenya-Somalia border. One was killed and the other kidnapped.

These incidents illustrate the continued threat posed by terrorism in Kenya and the capacity of terrorist groups which emanate from Somalia, to carry out attacks. One of the most likely perpetrators of an attack in Kenya is Al Shabaab, a militant group in Somalia who are opposed to the Somali government. Al Shabaab, and other terrorist groups, continue to carry out attacks in Somalia. Kenya is seen by Al Shabaab as a legitimate target because of its military intervention in Somalia, in support of the Somali government. Al Shabaab has previously issued public threats against Kenya.
Safety and Security – Crime

Incidents of armed car-hijackings are more prevalent in Nairobi and Mombasa but can occur in any area of the country. Do not attempt to escape from hijackers or resist their demands.

Remain vigilant at all times. Avoid stopping at the side of the road, particularly at night, and should drive defensively, with vehicle doors locked and windows closed at all times. (See Local Travel for more information).

Cases of kidnapping have increased since mid-2009 in Nairobi and some other major towns. Some have been opportunist crimes linked to car-jackings, while others appear to have been more organised. A resident British national was kidnapped on 29 October 2009 and two other incidents towards the end of 2009 involved resident European nationals. Although there is no evidence of the expatriate community being specifically targeted, both resident and visiting British nationals should remain vigilant at all times. See the Terrorism section of this advice for the British Government’s policy on concessions to hostage takers including payment of ransoms.

Muggings and incidents of armed robbery can occur at any time, particularly in Nairobi and Mombasa. Be alert at all times. Avoid walking around after dark as attacks can occur anywhere, but especially in isolated areas such as empty beaches. Do not carry valuables or wear jewellery in public places. Do not carry credit cards or cash cards unless you must: people have been forced by thieves to withdraw cash. Beware of thieves posing as police officers; always ask to see identification. Following a number of armed attacks on golf courses around Nairobi, be extra vigilant while playing in remote areas away from the Club House of any golf course.

Do not accept food or drink from strangers as it may be drugged. Only stay in tourist camps with good perimeter security. If in doubt, seek advice from your tour operator or the Kenya Tourist Federation (Tel:  + 254 20 604730).

In August 2009 a British resident was attacked and killed near Voi. Another British resident was killed in Thika in October and one in Nairobi in November. Two British visitors were killed during their stay in Mombasa in October 2009.

General – Consular Assistance Statistics

174,051 British Nationals visited Kenya in 2010 (Source: Kenya Tourist Board).  Most visits are trouble free. 81 British nationals required consular assistance in Kenya in the period 01 April 2010 – 31 March 2011 for the following types of incident, 18 deaths; 17 hospitalisations; and 17 arrests.

Dr Roselyn Akombe Resigns, FULL BBC Interview-18.10.2017

Exposed: Weinsten Sexual Harassment

Archives

Calendar

June 2012
M T W T F S S
« May   Jul »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  
Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On Facebook