The Kenya Forum | Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Concern Medics in Kenya - The Kenya Forum

May 8, 2023

Summary

424 women aged 15 years and above sampled at the two hospitals tested positive for gonorrhea and chlamydia.

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Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Concern Medics in Kenya

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Concern Medics in Kenya

Medics warn against new STI strains and mutating existing strains that are becoming more resistant to medicines…

The disturbing discovery of two new strains of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Kenya and the increasing resistance of existing strains to medication, has alarmed medics and should be of concern to us all.

The two new mutations of STIs have been reported by scientists at the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) and worryingly the new strains have not been encountered before in genes associated with gonorrhea and chlamydia in Kenya.

The uncovering of the new strains came about after researchers looked into rising STIs in two hospitals in Busia County which borders Uganda.

424 Women in Two Hospitals Infected by New Strains

Assistant principle research scientist at the Centre for Microbiology Research at KEMRI Professor Samson Muuo told the Daily Nation that 424 women aged 15 years and above sampled at the two hospitals tested positive for gonorrhea and chlamydia.

For further details see Alarm as new STIs strains discovered’ (Daily Nation).

Great Resistance and Over-The-Counter Treatment

Meanwhile, other experts have stressed concern at a worrying trend of STIs in the Kenyan population as they become more resistant to treatment and the growing number of people seeking self-medication from over-the-counter medicines that have not been prescribed by a doctor.

As reported in The Standard, Dr Stephen Kaliki, the Head of Reproductive and Maternal Health in the Ministry Health, noting the finding of new STI mutations, said that most Kenyans now buy antibiotics and do not seek professional treatment leading to the risk of further STI mutations.
Dr Kaliki said, “We are indeed seeing more stubborn new versions and variants and STIs which we used to treat without a problem, but it is turning out to be the opposite.”

“With mutation, conventional medicines are not treating the STIs”, Dr Kaliki said.

Exposure Fertility Risk

Fertility specialist at the University of Nairobi’s department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Professor Koigi Kamau, observed that when some patients are traced who have come in for fertility treatment they are found to have had a history of exposure of STIs.

“If you keep giving any medicine, they learn how to survive because they continue growing and become resistant. The infection then goes through your cervix and into reproductive organs”, Dr Koigi was reported in The Standard.

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